The Fellows of the Atria Academy of Science & Medicine span discipline, institution, and geography. What unites them is their commitment to driving forward medical research to improve health outcomes: In aggregate, they have authored more than 8,600 scientific papers, and studies by Academy members have a combined 878,400 citations.

Browse below to learn more about each Fellow.

Learn more about the 50+ Atria Academy Fellows guiding a transformation in medicine

Learn more about the 50+ Atria Academy Fellows guiding a transformation in medicine

Fellows Published Work

Psychological Impact and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptomatology After Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries in Baseball Players.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine

Collaborators
Collaborators: Frank J Alexander, Michael A Mastroianni, Matthew J J Anderson, Kira Skaggs, Hasani W Swindell, Alan W Reynolds, Christopher S Ahmad

Significant psychological impact and prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been well documented in patients sustaining anterior cruciate ligament injury.

What are our patients asking Google about acromioclavicular joint injuries?-frequently asked online questions and the quality of online resources.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : JSES reviews, reports, and techniques

Collaborators
Collaborators: Kyle K Obana, Dane R G Lind, Michael A Mastroianni, Alexander J Rondon, Frank J Alexander, William N Levine, Christopher S Ahmad

Management of acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries has been an ongoing source of debate, with over 150 variations of surgery described in the literature. Without a consensus on surgical technique, patients are seeking answers to common questions through internet resources. This study investigates the most common online patient questions pertaining to AC joint injuries and the quality of the websites providing information.

Abnormal Brachial Plexus Differentiation from Routine Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An AI-based Approach.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Neuroscience

Collaborators
Collaborators: Weiguo Cao, Benjamin M Howe, Darryl E Wright, Sumana Ramanathan, Nicholas G Rhodes, Panagiotis Korfiatis, Kimberly K Amrami, Robert J Spinner, Timothy L Kline

Automatic abnormality identification of brachial plexus (BP) from normal magnetic resonance imaging to localize and identify a neurologic injury in clinical practice (MRI) is still a novel topic in brachial plexopathy. This study developed and evaluated an approach to differentiate abnormal BP with artificial intelligence (AI) over three commonly used MRI sequences, i.e. T1, FLUID sensitive and post-gadolinium sequences. A BP dataset was collected by radiological experts and a semi-supervised artificial intelligence method was used to segment the BP (based on nnU-net). Hereafter, a radiomics method was utilized to extract 107 shape and texture features from these ROIs. From various machine learning methods, we selected six widely recognized classifiers for training our Brachial plexus (BP) models and assessing their efficacy. To optimize these models, we introduced a dynamic feature selection approach aimed at discarding redundant and less informative features. Our experimental findings demonstrated that, in the context of identifying abnormal BP cases, shape features displayed heightened sensitivity compared to texture features. Notably, both the Logistic classifier and Bagging classifier outperformed other methods in our study. These evaluations illuminated the exceptional performance of our model trained on FLUID-sensitive sequences, which notably exceeded the results of both T1 and post-gadolinium sequences. Crucially, our analysis highlighted that both its classification accuracies and AUC score (area under the curve of receiver operating characteristics) over FLUID-sensitive sequence exceeded 90%. This outcome served as a robust experimental validation, affirming the substantial potential and strong feasibility of integrating AI into clinical practice.

Validating Clinical Distal Radioulnar Joint Examination With Radiographic Parameters.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Hand (New York, N.Y.)

Collaborators
Collaborators: Jesse D Meaike, Joshua J Meaike, Kimberly K Amrami, Sanjeev Kakar

The purpose of this study was to quantify the in vivo displacement of bilateral distal radioulnar joints (DRUJs) in resisted pronosupination. We hypothesize that this will demonstrate no appreciable difference between the left and right DRUJ, thus validating the concept of using the uninjured wrist as a control for physical examination as well as dynamic imaging studies.

Oxidative phosphorylation regulates B cell effector cytokines and promotes inflammation in multiple sclerosis.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Science immunology

Collaborators
Collaborators: Rui Li, Yanting Lei, Ayman Rezk, Diego A Espinoza, Jing Wang, Huiru Feng, Bo Zhang, Isabella P Barcelos, Hang Zhang, Jing Yu, Xinrui Huo, Fangyi Zhu, Changxin Yang, Hao Tang, Amy C Goldstein, Brenda L Banwell, Hakon Hakonarson, Hongwei Xu, Michael Mingueneau, Bo Sun, Hulun Li, Amit Bar-Or

Dysregulated B cell cytokine production contributes to pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study we investigated how cytokine secretion by pro-inflammatory (GM-CSF-expressing) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10-expressing) B cells is regulated. Pro-inflammatory human B cells required increased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) compared with anti-inflammatory B cells. OXPHOS reciprocally modulated pro- and anti-inflammatory B cell cytokines through regulation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) signaling. Partial inhibition of OXPHOS or ATP-signaling including with BTK inhibition resulted in an anti-inflammatory B cell cytokine shift, reversed the B cell cytokine imbalance in patients with MS, and ameliorated neuroinflammation in a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalitis mouse model. Our study identifies how pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are metabolically regulated in B cells and identifies ATP and its metabolites as a "fourth signal" that shapes B cell responses and is a potential target for restoring the B cell cytokine balance in autoimmune diseases.

Hypothalamic MRI-derived microstructure is associated with neurocognitive aging in humans.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Neurobiology of aging

Collaborators
Collaborators: Sandra Aleksic, Roman Fleysher, Erica F Weiss, Noa Tal, Timothy Darby, Helena M Blumen, Juan Vazquez, Kenny Q Ye, Tina Gao, Shira M Siegel, Nir Barzilai, Michael L Lipton, Sofiya Milman

The hypothalamus regulates homeostasis across the lifespan and is emerging as a regulator of aging. In murine models, aging-related changes in the hypothalamus, including microinflammation and gliosis, promote accelerated neurocognitive decline. We investigated relationships between hypothalamic microstructure and features of neurocognitive aging, including cortical thickness and cognition, in a cohort of community-dwelling older adults (age range 65-97 years, n=124). Hypothalamic microstructure was evaluated with two magnetic resonance imaging diffusion metrics: mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), using a novel image processing pipeline. Hypothalamic MD was cross-sectionally positively associated with age and it was negatively associated with cortical thickness. Hypothalamic FA, independent of cortical thickness, was cross-sectionally positively associated with neurocognitive scores. An exploratory analysis of longitudinal neurocognitive performance suggested that lower hypothalamic FA may predict cognitive decline. No associations between hypothalamic MD, age, and cortical thickness were identified in a younger control cohort (age range 18-63 years, n=99). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that hypothalamic microstructure is associated with features of neurocognitive aging in humans.

Rare genetic coding variants associated with age-related episodic memory decline implicate distinct memory pathologies in the hippocampus.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : medRxiv : the preprint server for health sciences

Collaborators
Collaborators: Amanat Ali, Sofiya Milman, Erica F Weiss, Tina Gao, Valerio Napolioni, Nir Barzilai, Zhengdong D Zhang, Jhih-Rong Lin

Approximately 40% of people aged 65 or older experience memory loss, particularly in episodic memory. Identifying the genetic basis of episodic memory decline is crucial for uncovering its underlying causes.

Cognitive reserve proxies are associated with age-related cognitive decline - Not age-related gait speed decline.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Neurobiology of aging

Collaborators
Collaborators: Helena M Blumen, Oshadi Jayakody, Emmeline Ayers, Nir Barzilai, Christian Habeck, Sofiya Milman, Yaakov Stern, Erica F Weiss, Joe Verghese

Cognition and gait share brain substrates in aging and dementia. Cognitive reserve (CR) allows individuals to cope with brain pathology and delay cognitive impairment and dementia. Yet, evidence for that CR is associated with age-related cognitive decline is mixed, and evidence for that CR is associated with age-related gait decline is limited. In 1,079 older (M Age = 75.4 years; 56.0% women) LonGenity study participants without dementia at baseline and up to 12 years of annual follow-up (M follow-up = 3.9 years, SD = 2.5 years), high CR inferred from cognitive (education years), physical (number of blocks walked per day; weekly physical activity days), and social (volunteering/working; living with someone) proxies were associated with slower rates of age-related decline in global cognition - not gait speed decline. Thus, cognitive, physical, and social CR proxies are associated with cognitive decline in older adults without dementia. The multifactorial etiology and earlier decline in gait than cognition may render it less modifiable by CR proxies later in life.

Genome integrity as a potential index of longevity in Ashkenazi Centenarian's families.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : GeroScience

Collaborators
Collaborators: Mariana Andrawus, Gil Ben David, Ivana Terziyska, Lital Sharvit, Aviv Bergman, Nir Barzilai, Srilakshmi M Raj, Diddahally R Govindaraju, Gil Atzmon

The aging process, or senescence, is characterized by age-specific decline in physical and physiological function, and increased frailty and genomic changes, including mutation accumulation. However, the mechanisms through which changes in genomic architecture influence human longevity have remained obscure. Copy number variants (CNVs), an abundant class of genomic variants, offer unique opportunities for understanding age-related genomic changes. Here we report the spectrum of CNVs in a cohort of 670 Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians, their progeny, and unrelated controls. The average ages of these groups were 97.4 ± 2.8, 69.2 ± 9.2, and 66.5 ± 7.0 respectively. For the first time, we compared different size classes of CNVs, from 1 kB to 100 MB in size. Using a high-resolution custom Affymetrix array, targeting 44,639 genomic regions, we identified a total of 12,166, 22,188, and 10,285 CNVs in centenarians, their progeny, and control groups, respectively. Interestingly, the offspring group showed the highest number of unique CNVs, followed by control and centenarians. While both gains and losses were found in all three groups, centenarians showed a significantly higher average number of both total gains and losses relative to their controls (p < 0.0327, 0.0182, respectively). Moreover, centenarians showed a lower total length of genomic material lost, suggesting that they may maintain superior genomic integrity over time. We also observe a significance fold increase of CNVs among the offspring, implying greater genomic integrity and a putative mechanism for longevity preservation. Genomic regions that experienced loss or gains appear to be distributed across many sites in the genome and contain genes involved in DNA transcription, cellular transport, developmental pathways, and metabolic functions. Our findings suggest that the exceptional longevity observed in centenarians may be attributed to the prolonged maintenance of functionally important genes. These genes are intrinsic to specific genomic regions as well as to the overall integrity of the genomic architecture. Additionally, a strong association between longer CNVs and differential gene expression observed in this study supports the notion that genomic integrity could positively influence longevity.

MR elastography-based slip interface imaging (SII) for functional assessment of myofascial interfaces: A feasibility study.

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Date: 08/2024

Journal : Magnetic resonance in medicine

Collaborators
Collaborators: Emi Hojo, Yi Sui, Xiang Shan, Keni Zheng, Phillip Rossman, Armando Manduca, Garret M Powell, Kai-Nan An, Kristin D Zhao, Brent A Bauer, Richard L Ehman, Ziying Yin

Abnormal adherence at functional myofascial interfaces is hypothesized as an important phenomenon in myofascial pain syndrome. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of MR elastography (MRE)-based slip interface imaging (SII) to visualize and assess myofascial mobility in healthy volunteers.

Correction: Practice Standards in International Medical Departments of Public Academic Hospitals in China: Cross-Sectional Study.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : JMIR formative research

Collaborators
Collaborators: Ying Zhou, Yaxu Zhou, Di Xu, Jie Min, Yu Du, Qi Duan, Wen Bao, Yingying Sun, Huiqin Xi, Chunming Wang, Evelyne Bischof

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.2196/53898.].

Practice Standards in International Medical Departments of Public Academic Hospitals in China: Cross-Sectional Study.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : JMIR formative research

Collaborators
Collaborators: Yaxu Zhou, Ying Zhou, Di Xu, Jie Min, Yu Du, Qi Duan, Wen Bao, Yingying Sun, Huiqin Xi, Chunming Wang, Evelyne Bischof

Improving health care in cities with a diverse, international population is crucial for ensuring health equity, particularly for foreigners facing challenges due to cultural and language barriers. This situation is especially relevant in China, a major destination for expatriates and travelers, where optimizing health care services and incorporating international standards in the public sector are vital. Achieving this involves understanding the operational details, cultural and linguistic nuances, and advancing medical digitalization. A strategic approach focusing on cultural competence and awareness of health care systems is essential for effectively navigating health care for foreigners and expatriates in China.

The role of quality of life data as an endpoint for collecting real-world evidence within geroscience clinical trials.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Ageing research reviews

Collaborators
Collaborators: Girish Harinath, Sajad Zalzala, Andy Nyquist, Maartje Wouters, Anar Isman, Mauricio Moel, Eric Verdin, Matt Kaeberlein, Brian Kennedy, Evelyne Bischof

With geroscience research evolving at a fast pace, the need arises for human randomized controlled trials to assess the efficacy of geroprotective interventions to prevent age-related adverse outcomes, disease, and mortality in normative aging cohorts. However, to confirm efficacy requires a long-term and costly approach as time to the event of morbidity and mortality can be decades. While this could be circumvented using sensitive biomarkers of aging, current molecular, physiological, and digital endpoints require further validation. In this review, we discuss how collecting real-world evidence (RWE) by obtaining health data that is amenable for collection from large heterogeneous populations in a real-world setting can help speed up validation of geroprotective interventions. Further, we propose inclusion of quality of life (QoL) data as a biomarker of aging and candidate endpoint for geroscience clinical trials to aid in distinguishing healthy from unhealthy aging. We highlight how QoL assays can aid in accelerating data collection in studies gathering RWE on the geroprotective effects of repurposed drugs to support utilization within healthy longevity medicine. Finally, we summarize key metrics to consider when implementing QoL assays in studies, and present the short-form 36 (SF-36) as the most well-suited candidate endpoint.

Tau follows principal axes of functional and structural brain organization in Alzheimer's disease.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Nature communications

Collaborators
Collaborators: Julie Ottoy, Min Su Kang, Jazlynn Xiu Min Tan, Lyndon Boone, Reinder Vos de Wael, Bo-Yong Park, Gleb Bezgin, Firoza Z Lussier, Tharick A Pascoal, Nesrine Rahmouni, Jenna Stevenson, Jaime Fernandez Arias, Joseph Therriault, Seok-Jun Hong, Bojana Stefanovic, JoAnne McLaurin, Jean-Paul Soucy, Serge Gauthier, Boris C Bernhardt, Sandra E Black, Pedro Rosa-Neto, Maged Goubran

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a brain network disorder where pathological proteins accumulate through networks and drive cognitive decline. Yet, the role of network connectivity in facilitating this accumulation remains unclear. Using in-vivo multimodal imaging, we show that the distribution of tau and reactive microglia in humans follows spatial patterns of connectivity variation, the so-called gradients of brain organization. Notably, less distinct connectivity patterns ("gradient contraction") are associated with cognitive decline in regions with greater tau, suggesting an interaction between reduced network differentiation and tau on cognition. Furthermore, by modeling tau in subject-specific gradient space, we demonstrate that tau accumulation in the frontoparietal and temporo-occipital cortices is associated with greater baseline tau within their functionally and structurally connected hubs, respectively. Our work unveils a role for both functional and structural brain organization in pathology accumulation in AD, and supports subject-specific gradient space as a promising tool to map disease progression.

Persistent fatigue in post-acute COVID syndrome is associated with altered T1 MRI texture in subcortical structures: a preliminary investigation.

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Date: 07/2024

Journal : Behavioural brain research

Collaborators
Collaborators: Nathan W Churchill, Eugenie Roudaia, J Jean Chen, Allison Sekuler, Fuqiang Gao, Mario Masellis, Benjamin Lam, Ivy Cheng, Chris Heyn, Sandra E Black, Bradley J MacIntosh, Simon J Graham, Tom A Schweizer

Post-acute COVID syndrome (PACS) is a global health concern and is often associated with debilitating symptoms. Post-COVID fatigue is a particularly frequent and troubling issue, and its underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. One potential contributor is micropathological injury of subcortical and brainstem structures, as has been identified in other patient populations. Texture-based analysis (TA) may be used to measure such changes in anatomical MRI data. The present study develops a methodology of voxel-wise TA mapping in subcortical and brainstem regions, which is then applied to T1-weighted MRI data from a cohort of 48 individuals who had PACS (32 with and 16 without ongoing fatigue symptoms) and 15 controls who had cold and flu-like symptoms but tested negative for COVID-19. Both groups were assessed an average of 4-5 months post-infection. There were no significant differences between PACS and control groups, but significant differences were observed within the PACS groups, between those with and without fatigue symptoms. This included reduced texture energy and increased entropy, along with reduced texture correlation, cluster shade and profile in the putamen, pallidum, thalamus and brainstem. These findings provide new insights into the neurophysiological mechanisms that underlie PACS, with altered tissue texture as a potential biomarker of this debilitating condition.

MAPT H2 haplotype and risk of Pick's disease in the Pick's disease International Consortium: a genetic association study.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : The Lancet. Neurology

Collaborators
Collaborators: Rebecca R Valentino, William J Scotton, Shanu F Roemer, Tammaryn Lashley, Michael G Heckman, Maryam Shoai, Alejandro Martinez-Carrasco, Nicole Tamvaka, Ronald L Walton, Matthew C Baker, Hannah L Macpherson, Raquel Real, Alexandra I Soto-Beasley, Kin Mok, Tamas Revesz, Elizabeth A Christopher, Michael DeTure, William W Seeley, Edward B Lee, Matthew P Frosch, Laura Molina-Porcel, Tamar Gefen, Javier Redding-Ochoa, Bernardino Ghetti, Andrew C Robinson, Christopher Kobylecki, James B Rowe, Thomas G Beach, Andrew F Teich, Julia L Keith, Istvan Bodi, Glenda M Halliday, Marla Gearing, Thomas Arzberger, Christopher M Morris, Charles L White, Naguib Mechawar, Susana Boluda, Ian R MacKenzie, Catriona McLean, Matthew D Cykowski, Shih-Hsiu J Wang, Caroline Graff, Rashed M Nagra, Gabor G Kovacs, Giorgio Giaccone, Manuela Neumann, Lee-Cyn Ang, Agostinho Carvalho, Huw R Morris, Rosa Rademakers, John A Hardy, Dennis W Dickson, Jonathan D Rohrer, Owen A Ross,

Pick's disease is a rare and predominantly sporadic form of frontotemporal dementia that is classified as a primary tauopathy. Pick's disease is pathologically defined by the presence in the frontal and temporal lobes of Pick bodies, composed of hyperphosphorylated, three-repeat tau protein, encoded by the MAPT gene. MAPT has two distinct haplotypes, H1 and H2; the MAPT H1 haplotype is the major genetic risk factor for four-repeat tauopathies (eg, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration), and the MAPT H2 haplotype is protective for these disorders. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the association of MAPT H2 with Pick's disease risk, age at onset, and disease duration.

[Not Available].

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association

Collaborators
Collaborators: Maurice Pasternak, Saira S Mirza, Nicholas Luciw, Henri J M M Mutsaerts, Jan Petr, David Thomas, David Cash, Martina Bocchetta, Maria Carmela Tartaglia, Sara B Mitchell, Sandra E Black, Morris Freedman, David Tang-Wai, Ekaterina Rogaeva, Lucy L Russell, Arabella Bouzigues, John C van Swieten, Lize C Jiskoot, Harro Seelaar, Robert Laforce, Pietro Tiraboschi, Barbara Borroni, Daniela Galimberti, James B Rowe, Caroline Graff, Elizabeth Finger, Sandro Sorbi, Alexandre de Mendonça, Chris Butler, Alex Gerhard, Raquel Sanchez-Valle, Fermin Moreno, Matthis Synofzik, Rik Vandenberghe, Simon Ducharme, Johannes Levin, Markus Otto, Isabel Santana, Antonio P Strafella, Bradley J MacIntosh, Jonathan D Rohrer, Mario Masellis,

Effective longitudinal biomarkers that track disease progression are needed to characterize the presymptomatic phase of genetic frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We investigate the utility of cerebral perfusion as one such biomarker in presymptomatic FTD mutation carriers.

The Integration of Clinical Trials With the Practice of Medicine: Repairing a House Divided.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : JAMA

Collaborators
Collaborators: Derek C Angus, Alison J Huang, Roger J Lewis, Amy P Abernethy, Robert M Califf, Martin Landray, Nancy Kass, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo,

Optimal health care delivery, both now and in the future, requires a continuous loop of knowledge generation, dissemination, and uptake on how best to provide care, not just determining what interventions work but also how best to ensure they are provided to those who need them. The randomized clinical trial (RCT) is the most rigorous instrument to determine what works in health care. However, major issues with both the clinical trials enterprise and the lack of integration of clinical trials with health care delivery compromise medicine's ability to best serve society.

Evidence for a novel neuronal mechanism driving Alzheimer's disease, upstream of amyloid.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association

Collaborators
Collaborators: Sara Garcia Ratés, María-Salud García-Ayllón, Neus Falgàs, Sharon A Brangman, Margaret M Esiri, Clive W Coen, Susan Adele Greenfield

This perspective offers an alternative to the amyloid hypothesis in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We review evidence for a novel signaling mechanism based on a little-known peptide, T14. T14 could drive neurodegeneration as an aberrantly activated process of plasticity selective to interconnecting subcortical nuclei, the isodendritic core, where cell loss starts at the pre-symptomatic stages of the disease. Each of these cell groups has the capacity to form T14, which can stimulate production of p-Tau and β-amyloid, suggestive of an upstream driver of neurodegeneration. Moreover, results in an animal AD model show that antagonism of T14 with a cyclated variant, NBP14, prevents formation of β-amyloid, and restores cognitive function to that of wild-type counterparts. Any diagnostic and/or therapeutic strategy based on T14-NBP14 awaits validation in clinical trials. However, an understanding of this novel signaling system could bring much-needed fresh insights into the progression of cell loss underlying AD. HIGHLIGHTS: The possible primary mechanism of neurodegeneration upstream of amyloid. Primary involvement of selectively vulnerable subcortical nuclei, isodendritic core. Bioactive peptide T14 trophic in development but toxic in context of mature brain. Potential for early-stage biomarker to detect Alzheimer's disease. Effective therapeutic halting neurodegeneration, validated already in 5XFAD mice.

Time-resolved coupling between connectome harmonics and subjective experience under the psychedelic DMT.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : bioRxiv : the preprint server for biology

Collaborators
Collaborators: Jakub Vohryzek, Andrea Luppi, Selen Atasoy, Gustavo Deco, Christopher Timmermann, Robin L Carhart-Harris, Morten L Kringelbach

Exploring the intricate relationship between brain's structure and function, and how this affects subjective experience is a fundamental pursuit in neuroscience. Psychedelic substances offer a unique insight into the influences of specific neurotransmitter systems on perception, cognition and consciousness. Specifically, their impact on brain function propagates across the structural connectome, a network of white matter pathways linking different regions. To comprehensively grasp the effects of psychedelic compounds on brain function, we used a theoretically rigorous framework known as connectome harmonic decomposition. This framework provides a robust method to characterize how brain function intricately depends on the organized network structure of the human connectome. We show that the connectome harmonic repertoire under DMT is reshaped in line with other reported psychedelic compounds; psilocybin, LSD and ketamine. Furthermore, we show that the repertoire entropy of connectome harmonics increases under DMT, as with those other psychedelics. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that measures of energy spectrum difference and repertoire entropy of connectome harmonics indexes the intensity of subjective experience of the participants in a time-resolved manner reflecting close coupling between connectome harmonics and subjective experience.

Effects of Psychedelics in Older Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

Collaborators
Collaborators: Hannes Kettner, Leor Roseman, Adam Gazzaley, Robin L Carhart-Harris, Lorenzo Pasquini

Affective symptoms such as anxiety, low mood, and loneliness are prevalent and highly debilitating symptoms among older adults (OA). Serotonergic psychedelics are currently investigated as novel interventions for affective disorders, yet little is known regarding their effects in OA. We investigated the mental health effects and psychological mechanisms of guided psychedelic group experiences in OA and a matched sample of younger adults (YA).

The flattening of spacetime hierarchy of the -dimethyltryptamine brain state is characterized by harmonic decomposition of spacetime (HADES) framework.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : National science review

Collaborators
Collaborators: Jakub Vohryzek, Joana Cabral, Christopher Timmermann, Selen Atasoy, Leor Roseman, David J Nutt, Robin L Carhart-Harris, Gustavo Deco, Morten L Kringelbach

The human brain is a complex system, whose activity exhibits flexible and continuous reorganization across space and time. The decomposition of whole-brain recordings into harmonic modes has revealed a repertoire of gradient-like activity patterns associated with distinct brain functions. However, the way these activity patterns are expressed over time with their changes in various brain states remains unclear. Here, we investigate healthy participants taking the serotonergic psychedelic -dimethyltryptamine (DMT) with the Harmonic Decomposition of Spacetime (HADES) framework that can characterize how different harmonic modes defined in space are expressed over time. HADES demonstrates significant decreases in contributions across most low-frequency harmonic modes in the DMT-induced brain state. When normalizing the contributions by condition (DMT and non-DMT), we detect a decrease specifically in the second functional harmonic, which represents the uni- to transmodal functional hierarchy of the brain, supporting the leading hypothesis that functional hierarchy is changed in psychedelics. Moreover, HADES' dynamic spacetime measures of fractional occupancy, life time and latent space provide a precise description of the significant changes of the spacetime hierarchical organization of brain activity in the psychedelic state.

Psychedelics and the 'inner healer': Myth or mechanism?

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Journal of psychopharmacology (Oxford, England)

Collaborators
Collaborators: Joseph Peill, Miriam Marguilho, David Erritzoe, Tommaso Barba, Kyle T Greenway, Fernando Rosas, Christopher Timmermann, Robin Carhart-Harris

Reference to an intrinsic healing mechanism or an 'inner healer' is commonplace amongst psychedelic drug-using cultures. The 'inner healer' refers to the belief that psychedelic compounds, plants or concoctions have an intrinsically regenerative action on the mind and brain, analogous to intrinsic healing mechanisms within the physical body, for example, after sickness or injury.

Functional impairment of chronic migraine with medication overuse: Secondary analysis from the Medication Overuse Treatment Strategy (MOTS) trial.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Headache

Collaborators
Collaborators: Samantha C Shao, Joseph Hentz, Patti Shank, Michael Leonard, David W Dodick, Todd J Schwedt

Chronic migraine exerts substantial negative impacts on daily functioning. Efforts to manage impaired functioning may result in medication overuse, which contributes to the worsening profile and chronification of migraine. The Migraine Functional Impact Questionnaire (MFIQ) is a recently developed measure assessing the impact of migraine on physical, social, and emotional function.

Sustained response to atogepant in episodic migraine: post hoc analyses of a 12-week randomized trial and a 52-week long-term safety trial.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : The journal of headache and pain

Collaborators
Collaborators: Richard B Lipton, Stephanie J Nahas, Patricia Pozo-Rosich, Tanya Bilchik, Peter McAllister, Michelle Finnegan, Yingyi Liu, Natty Chalermpalanupap, Brett Dabruzzo, David W Dodick

Atogepant is an oral calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist approved for the preventive treatment of migraine in adults. These analyses evaluated the proportions of clinical trial participants who experienced sustained responses to atogepant over 12 or 52 weeks of treatment.

Photophobia Contributes to Migraine-Associated Disability and Reduced Work Productivity: Results From the American Registry for Migraine Research (ARMR).

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Journal of neuro-ophthalmology : the official journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society

Collaborators
Collaborators: Zachary Leibovit-Reiben, Gina Dumkrieger, David W Dodick, Kathleen Digre, Catherine D Chong, Meesha Trivedi, Todd J Schwedt

Photosensitivity, often called "photophobia" in the migraine literature, is a common and bothersome symptom for most people during their migraine attacks. This study aimed to investigate the association of photophobia severity with work productivity, activity impairment, and migraine-associated disability using data from a large cohort of patients with migraine who were enrolled into the American Registry for Migraine Research (ARMR).

Nutritional and inflammatory aspects of low parathyroid hormone in maintenance hemodialysis patients - a longitudinal study.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation

Collaborators
Collaborators: Shani Zilberman-Itskovich, Baker Algamal, Ada Azar, Shai Efrati, Ilia Beberashvili

Low serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an accepted marker for adynamic bone disease which is characterized by increased morbidity and mortality in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. In light of the known cross-sectional associations between PTH and malnutrition-inflammation syndrome, we aimed to examine the longitudinal associations between PTH with changes in nutritional and inflammatory parameters and clinical outcomes in MHD patients with low PTH.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy vs. pharmacological intervention in adults with fibromyalgia related to childhood sexual abuse: prospective, randomized clinical trial.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : Scientific reports

Collaborators
Collaborators: Rahav Boussi-Gross, Merav Catalogna, Erez Lang, Zipora Shamai, Jacob N Ablin, Valerie Aloush, Keren Doenyas-Barak, Mordechai Lorberboym, Rachel Lev-Wiesel, Shai Efrati

Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by disruptions in pain processing within the central nervous system. It exhibits a high prevalence among patients with a history of traumatic experiences, notably childhood sexual abuse (CSA). This study compared the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) to the current pharmacological standard of care for individuals suffering from CSA-related FMS. Forty-eight participants diagnosed with FMS and a history of CSA were randomly assigned to either the HBOT group (60 sessions of 100% oxygen at 2 ATA for 90 min, with air breaks every 5 min) or the medication (MED) group (FDA-approved medications, Pregabalin and Duloxetine). The primary endpoint was the Fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ) score, while secondary endpoints encompassed emotional status and daily functioning questionnaires, as well as pain thresholds and conditioned pain modulation tests. Brain activity was evaluated through single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Results revealed a significant group-by-time interaction for the FIQ score favoring HBOT over MED (p < 0.001), with a large effect size (Cohen's d = - 1.27). Similar findings were observed in emotional symptoms and functional measures. SPECT imaging demonstrated an increase in activity in pre-frontal and temporal brain areas, which correlated with symptoms improvement. In conclusion, HBOT exhibited superior benefits over medications in terms of physical, functional, and emotional improvements among FMS patients with a history of CSA. This associated with increased activity in pre-frontal and temporal brain areas, highlighting the neuroplasticity effect of HBOT.

Ischemic Stroke with Comorbid Cancer Has Specific miRNA-mRNA Networks in Blood That Vary by Ischemic Stroke Mechanism.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Annals of neurology

Collaborators
Collaborators: Bodie Knepp, Babak B Navi, Fernando Rodriguez, Lisa M DeAngelis, Mitchell S V Elkind, Costantino Iadecola, Carla P Sherman, Scott T Tagawa, Ashish Saxena, Allyson J Ocean, Heather Hull, Glen Jickling, Frank R Sharp, Bradley P Ander, Boryana Stamova

Approximately half of ischemic strokes (IS) in cancer patients are cryptogenic, with many presumed cardioembolic. We evaluated whether there were specific miRNA and mRNA transcriptome architectures in peripheral blood of IS patients with and without comorbid cancer, and between cardioembolic versus noncardioembolic IS etiologies in comorbid cancer.

Evidence of varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation in children with arterial ischemic stroke: Results of the VIPS II Study.

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Date: 05/2024

Journal : medRxiv : the preprint server for health sciences

Collaborators
Collaborators: Heather J Fullerton, Nancy K Hills, Max Wintermark, Nomazulu Dlamini, Catherine Amlie-Lefond, Michael M Dowling, Lori C Jordan, Timothy J Bernard, Neil R Friedman, Mitchell S V Elkind, Charles Grose,

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) has been associated with focal cerebral arteriopathy (FCA) and arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) in childhood. The Vascular effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS) II study aimed to examine this relationship in the modern era when most children in North America and Australia receive VZV vaccination with live, attenuated virus.

Forecasting the Economic Burden of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in the United States Through 2050: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Circulation

Collaborators
Collaborators: Dhruv S Kazi, Mitchell S V Elkind, Anne Deutsch, William N Dowd, Paul Heidenreich, Olga Khavjou, Daniel Mark, Michael E Mussolino, Bruce Ovbiagele, Sonali S Patel, Remy Poudel, Ben Weittenhiller, Tiffany M Powell-Wiley, Karen E Joynt Maddox,

Quantifying the economic burden of cardiovascular disease and stroke over the coming decades may inform policy, health system, and community-level interventions for prevention and treatment.

Forecasting the Burden of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in the United States Through 2050-Prevalence of Risk Factors and Disease: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Circulation

Collaborators
Collaborators: Karen E Joynt Maddox, Mitchell S V Elkind, Hugo J Aparicio, Yvonne Commodore-Mensah, Sarah D de Ferranti, William N Dowd, Adrian F Hernandez, Olga Khavjou, Erin D Michos, Latha Palaniappan, Joanne Penko, Remy Poudel, Véronique L Roger, Dhruv S Kazi,

Cardiovascular disease and stroke are common and costly, and their prevalence is rising. Forecasts on the prevalence of risk factors and clinical events are crucial.

Hormonal Contraception and Sexual Function: A Review, Clinical Insights, and Management Considerations.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Obstetrics and gynecology clinics of North America

Collaborators
Collaborators: Mariam Saadedine, Stephanie S Faubion

Most sexually active women of reproductive age have used contraception, with hormonal methods constituting approximately 40% of contraceptive choices. Among these hormonal options, combined oral contraceptives stand out as the most selected. Within this same demographic, sexual issues are prevalent. Although specific hormonal contraceptives have been implicated in sexual dysfunction among these women, the correlation lacks consistency across studies and varies between different types of hormonal contraception. This article assesses the available literature on the associations between various hormonal contraceptive methods and sexual function and provides practical management insights.

Risks and benefits of hormone therapy after menopause for cognitive decline and dementia: A conceptual review.

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Date: 06/2024

Journal : Maturitas

Collaborators
Collaborators: Walter A Rocca, Kejal Kantarci, Stephanie S Faubion

The effects on the brain of hormone therapy after the onset of menopause remain uncertain. The effects may be beneficial, neutral, or harmful. We provide a conceptual review of the evidence.

Menopause in the workplace: Challenges, impact, and next steps.

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Date: 07/2024

Journal : Maturitas

Collaborators
Collaborators: Nancy Safwan, Mariam Saadedine, Chrisandra L Shufelt, Ekta Kapoor, Juliana M Kling, Rajeev Chaudhry, Stephanie S Faubion

Menopause is a natural part of a woman's life that coincides with a time when many women play significant roles in the workforce. Menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes, fatigue, and difficulty with concentration and memory, can have a negative effect on work productivity and efficiency.